Jeopardy Paper’s Out! (aka. why I’m not on Academic Twitter)

After 4 years of off-again, on-again writing, my paper about my Jeopardy experiences is finally out! Check out “How to survive a public faming: Understanding “The Spiciest Memelord” via the temporal dynamics of involuntary celebrification” here on First Monday.

I also highly recommend checking out the other articles in this Special Issue of Shame, Shaming and Online Image Sharing. In particular, I really recommend Signe Uldbjerg’s piece on “The rhythms of shame in digital sexual assault: Rythmic resistance and the repeated assault“. Although my Jeopardy experience is not even comparable to the trauma faced by the survivors in her piece, the descriptions of facing harassment that decreases in intensity but does not stop and the struggle to find agency against the shamers really resonates with me.

My paper is fairly technical so if you’re looking for just the tl;dr summary:

  • We think of public shaming as purely punishment of social transgressions, but there’s no reason that the dynamics of this shaming should only be relegated to negative transgressions. What about celebrations of social transgressions — a “public faming”?
  • Case in point: There’s a weird class of internet celebrities that are famous for a very brief amount of time through non-consensual sharing of their image. Think Star Wars Kid, Antoine Dodson / Bed Intruder, Alex From Target, or Ken Bone. Depending on how online you are, you’ve probably never heard of any of these people, but for very brief moments, they were catapulted to a very intense fame and public scrutiny before going back to obscurity. Traditional celebrity studies has ignored these cases as “not real celebrity” but what is the actual effect of this faming on the people themselves?
  • This is where I come in with my self-examination (auto-ethnography) of my own experiences as the Spiciest Memelord. I lean heavily on Anne Jerslev’s theory of “celebrity temporalities” to describe how I get caught in the middle between slow yet powerful traditional institutions vs. the fast distributed interactions of strangers on social media. Think broadcast television and press releases vs. tweets and Facebook posts. The crash of these two forms squeezes me in the middle and I suffer a lot of internet harassment while large corporations take control of my image to serve their own narratives
  • I describe how it feels to be caught in this situation and how I try to take back agency by reversing the spotlight onto my harassers. (I call this “radical reciprocity”, but Uldbjerg’s work has introduced me to the term “counter-shaming”). I do this by using my (tiny) fame platform as the Spiciest Memelord to call out MIT on its inequities or by using social media search against a sexual harasser to contact his friends and family.

You might be saying to yourself “wow, that tl;dr really felt like it should be a Twitter thread capping off the research”. And honestly, it probably should! But after a lot of angsting back and forth, I think I’ve finally settled that I’m not going to get onto Academic Twitter — for actually a lot of reasons related to my experiences on Jeopardy.

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Wikibooks’ Guide to “Getting A Girl”

No shit, so there I was listening to some meme music about various junk foods, like “Combination Pizza Hut and Taco Bell” and “$2 Hot Dog, $1 Water“. Being a proper scholar, I was looking up the songs on Wikipedia to try to find out more about how these songs got made, when I noticed something weird on the sidebar: “Guide to Social Activity/Dating Ideas“. Hoping that it would be like this weird 1940s dating PSA my dad sent me once, I clicked through.

It turns out to have been a weird time capsule, alright, just not the random mildly wholesome one that I was hoping for. Read More »

WHEEK WHEEK READ MEEEEE

“4000+ words about guinea pigs is your gender now. I’m sorry I don’t make the rules” — Petey

For Petey and Mehitabel’s class on networked / internet cultures, we had to write a bot and then write a short paper about it as a social actor. I decided to take the time to write up about Espen and Aarseth, the digital guinea pig bots (partially because Mehitabel encouraged me to talk about phenomenologybot during class instead). The paper ended up going long (2-3x more than what Petey wanted) because it ended up being a reflection of my digital life for the last 6 years.

Paper can be found here. If you like presentations more, that can be found here.

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Angsting about CMS and Robotics

It’s “ethics week” in Petey and Mehitabel’s “Networked Cultures class” and I accidentally wrote 2.5 benkrafts on this prompt. I guess if you haven’t talked to me in a while, it’s a pretty good summary of my screaming for the last two years.

inb4 Ava gives me yet more grief for not using my insane fellowship money for just fucking off and actually just doing CMS full time, aka. “When was the last time you touched a robot?”

DQ1: Read deTar. Share an occasion where you have felt the terms of your professional or educational success were in conflict with your ethics. Can you apply this advice practically?

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Link Anthology

  1. “Death and Taxes” – Urayoan Noel
  2. “The Truth” – Tim Dlugos
  3. “Improvisation on Them” – Linda Susan Jackson
  4. “The Tree of Knowledge” – Shane McCrae
  5. “Letter to My Father” – Martin Espada
  6. “In Perpetual Spring” – Amy Gerstler
  7. “Carpet Bomb” – Kenyatta Rogers
  8. “Money” – Philip Larkin
  9. “Redacted from a Know-Your-Rights Training Agenda” – Cynthia Dewi Oka
  10. “Shards” – Aline Murray Kilmer
  11. “The semantics of flowers on Memorial Day” – Bob Hicok
  12. “On Swearing” – Gary Dop
  13. “Poem in Which I Only Use Vowels” – Paola Capó-Garcia
  14. “Questions” – Rachel Richardson
  15. “The Mortician in San Francisco” – Randall Mann
  16. “The Lyric in a Time of War” – Eloise Klein Healy
  17. “San Benito” – Chip Livingston
  18. “A Display of Mackerel” – Mark Doty
  19. “Study Guide of the Naturalization of the Mouth”- Maryam Ivette Parhizkar
  20. “Kissing My Father” – Joseph O. Legaspi
  21. “Introduction to Mycology” – Chelsea Rathburn
  22. “Why Bother?” – Sean Thomas Doughtery
  23. “My Grandmother Washes Her Feet in the Sink of the Bathroom at Sears” – Mohja Kahf
  24. “The S in ‘I Loves You, Porgy'” – Nabila Lovelace
  25. “The God Who Loves You” – Carl Dennis
  26. “José Dominguez, the First Latino in Outer Space” – Dan Vera
  27. “Lemon and Cedar” – Melissa Stein
  28. “Some Interpersonal Verbs, Conjugated by Gender” – Alexandra Petri
  29. “The Prophetess Sojourner Truth Discusses the Two Different Versions of Her Most Well-Known Speech, One Nearly Unknown and One Very Beloved Yet Mostly Untrue” – Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
  30. “Field of Skulls” – Mary Karr
  31. “She Walketh Veiled and Sleeping” – Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  32. “The Loneliness of the Military Historian” – Margaret Atwood
  33. “Losses” – Andrew Motion

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Necropost: Truly Marvelous Posts

I originally put the last post into a private category, which led me to look at the other private posts about gender and religion I had that were referred to in this post. As stated nearly 3 years ago,

Maybe someday, if I become more comfortable with these topics, they will become password protected posts, but that day is not today.

Well, surprisingly, that day is today. I’ve changed a lot in the last 3 years, and while these views aren’t really accurate to my current state of mind, the stories definitely are and I’d like them to be shared. As stated in my religion post:

Perhaps I send things to litchin@ in the vain hope that if more people know my stories, they won’t all die with me. Or at least Google will hold them in their musty-server-rack-in-the-cloud/butt

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Necropost: “Rape Fantasies” – Margaret Atwood

This post is mainly a response to the really oddly high amount of traffic that one of my early posts “‘Rape Fantasies’ — Margaret Atwood” gets. It’s been almost 4 years since I wrote the original post — it’s so rambly now and badly written that I feel a little embarrassed that it gets such high traffic. I figure now is a good time to write about it again with a newer perspective.

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